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THREE TOWN GREENS

By Karin | July 12, 2010

1850s drawings of Branford, Guilford, and Madison and their Town Greens (from top to bottom) THREE TOWN GREENS The three Connecticut Shoreline towns of Branford, Guilford and Madison were settled in 1638, 1639 and 1650 respectively, each around a Town Green. This open area, commonly found in English towns (also known as the Common), was…

THREE TOWN SIGNS

By Karin | July 9, 2010

THREE TOWN SIGNS From Branford’s Plaque (pictured left): In 1638 the New Haven Colony traded ‘eleven coats of trucking cloth and one coat of English cloth made in the English fashion’ to the Mattabesec Indians fro land known as Totokett (Tidal River). The first permanent settlement was established in 1644 when people from Wethersfield came…

WORDS OF THE WEEK – JUNE 28, 2010

By Karin | June 28, 2010

These are terms from the world of Town Planning. VILLAGE OR TOWN GREEN, a common open area which is a part of a settlement. Traditionally, such an area was often common grass land at the centre of a small agricultural settlement, used for grazing and sometimes for community events. Some may also have a pond, originally…

THE ROW HOUSE: ORIGINS & TRANSFORMATIONS

By Karin | June 24, 2010

The Row House originated in Northern European and British cities during the 16th and 17th centuries. By definition, row houses are individual houses attached one to the other and sharing common side walls and a roof. The Place des Vosges in Paris, built in 1605, is lined with row houses, with stores on the ground…

THE SKINNY ON BOSTON’S NARROWEST HOUSE

By Karin | June 21, 2010

The narrowest rowhouse in Boston was built in 1874 allegedly as a ‘spite house’. According to local legend, 2 brothers inherited land from their father. While one brother was away on military duty, the other built himself a large home, with only a sliver of property left as open space. The second brother, on his…

WORDS OF THE WEEK – JUNE 15, 2010

By Karin | June 15, 2010

These are terms from the world of multi-family residences. ROW HOUSE, TERRACE HOUSE OR TOWNHOUSE A style of medium-density housing that originated in Europe in the late 17th century, where a row of identical or mirror-image houses share side walls. BROWNSTONE, BRICK ROW HOUSE, OR EASTERN TOWNHOUSE 19th century-style house, usually having 4 or 5…

From our Portfolio: Historical Restoration

By Karin | June 10, 2010

The rectory at Christ Episcopal Church in Guilford stands on the East side of the Green, just South of the church. The house’s construction had been previously dated as 1805. When Karin Patriquin Architect (KPA) was approached to join the Restoration Committee for the rectory, to help determine the best way to restore the exterior…

INTERIOR SIGNAGE – CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH

By Karin | June 3, 2010

  The design of signage in a building should reflect the design features of the building and the philosophies of the building’s users. The combination of good design and clear way-finding graphics are what create effective and elegant signage. At Christ Episcopal Church in Guilford, we were creating as-built drawings of the church, the parish…

The Traveling Architect: The Algarve, Portugal

By Karin | May 27, 2010

THE TRAVELLING ARCHITECT: THE ALGARVE, PORTUGAL This April, my family visited the Algarve in Portugal. Travelling in the off-season proved a very rewarding journey, as we were able to visit museums, restaurants and beaches without the crowds. We stayed in a small house in the hills north of the coastline and woke up to the…

THE TRAVELING ARCHITECT: PARIS IN SPRING

By Karin | May 12, 2010

THE TRAVELLING ARCHITECT: PARIS IN SPRING As an architect I sometimes have the chance to travel. In travelling I see a wide range of architectural feats, some old and some new. During my recent family trip to Paris, we made it our goal to simply walk around the city and experience what we could on…

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